Let There Be Light (1946)

Week #14

Let There Be Light (1946) — known to the U.S. Army as PMF 5019 — is a documentary film directed by American filmmaker John Huston, while serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II.

Our class this Tuesday has some readings on PTSD and the terrible impact this disorder had on returning veterans. I have covered this topic for several of my history courses and this film was part of my research. John Huston was an amazing film director, writer, producer and actor. Some of his most famous films are: The Maltese Falcon, Key Largo, and The African Queen. It is notable that Huston, while serving as a Major in the Army Signal Corps, directed this documentary.

The film was intended to educate the public about PTSD and its treatment among returning WWII veterans. Unfortunately, the film’s gritty unscripted presentation of PTSD was so upsetting the government suppressed the film, and it was not released until the 1980s.

WEEK#13: What is Schizophrenia?

Above is an informational TEDed about Schizophrenia. In class, we have talked about Schizophrenia, and reading Pete Earley’s book we get first-hand accounts of the disorder, but I wanted to know more. Schizophrenia is a complex disorder and does not present the same in every individual. Earley’s work is, in my opinion, pessimistic which is understandable because of the case studies he did I’m Miami. But, I wanted a more generalized and unbiased view of the disorder and the TEDed does a good job of that.

A Father’s Love (Or Vice-Versa)

As I’ve been reading Pete Earley’s Crazy, my main focus has been on one particular factor, which is proven by the book itself; Earley’s love for his son, Mike.

From the other sources which we have read; most asylum patients were particularly disposed of and isolated by their families. Earley’s entire case study of the inhumane treatment and disposal of the mentally ill to understand the importance of proper mental health treatment is something that I personally find quite touching.

Even from the very beginning of the book, Earley describes how mental illness does not discriminate; it can happen to anyone, regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, etc. I think that this is a very important factor to emphasize.

I like this book. I’d recommend it.

Implementation of Hawaii’s “Forced Treatment” Law

Hawaii has the highest per capital rate of homelessness in the nation. About a third of homeless in Hawaii suffer from mental illness. This 2019 article discusses the strengthening of Hawaii’s Assisted Community Treatment Law, first enacted in 2013, whose goal was to compel severely mentally ill to receive psychiatric treatment when they are a danger to themselves. The previous law was vague in its language about what constituted a person’s being a danger to themselves. Many civil rights advocates in the state argued that the law applied only to persons threatening to kill themselves or do bodily harm to themselves. Consequently, only ten people were ever compelled to receive treatment under this law. The updated law makes the language more clear, stating that a demonstrated inability for a person to “provide themselves adequate food, shelter, or medical care–including medical care,” constitutes a person’s being a danger to themselves. https://www.civilbeat.org/2019/09/homeless-advocates-test-hawaiis-new-forced-treatment-law/

Week 13

This week I chose to focus on a theme that has come up frequently this week with Earley. This is the problem of homelessness and mental health. Many of our mental health patients have been neglected to the point that homelessness has become a real problem. Many of the people in homeless encampments face many horrors daily such as violence or disease. The video highlights that the massive amount of homeless people in cities are beginning to show people that we are not doing a good job at providing mental health treatment. Also, the types of places that these homeless people are residing in are places that can cause danger or abuse resulting in imprisonment, feeding the vicious cycle once again.

Pete Earley and Virginia’s Mental Hospitals

While reading Crazy this week, I wanted to find more information on the book’s author, Pete Earley. While searching, I came across an article that he wrote for the Washington Post earlier this year about the state of mental hospitals in Virginia. He explains that these hospitals are running out of space and can no longer accept any new patients. The reason for the lack of space is private hospitals dumping patients that are difficult to take care of (i.e., mental health patients). Earley goes on to explain how and why private hospitals can do this and other issues that plague mental health hospitals in the state.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/07/22/virginias-mental-health-hospitals-are-burdened-by-patient-dumping/

Post for Week 13

Hello everyone at the bottom of this post will be a link to the the Virginia law site. The law being linked is the Virginia state law related to the the involuntary incarceration of the mentally ill. The reason for linking this site is quite obvious due to what we have been reading this week with Mike’s story and all. I hope this helps everyone understand all the red tape that Pete his family had to deal with when dealing with Mike’s court case.

https://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title37.2/chapter8/section37.2-817/

Pete Earley

http://www.peteearley.com/author/

This is Pete Earley’s website that essentially compiles all of his works and information about him. While reading Crazy, one thing that I haven’t been able to shake is the family response to Mikes condition. Being in a family that has had similar issues with mental illness and trying to navigate the proper response and providing effective help, I found Earley’s work to portray those battles extremely well. It shows the raw frustration and annoyance followed by the guilt and anger of everyone involved.

Incarnation Nation

Since we are reading Pete Earley’s Crazy: A Father’s Search Through America’s Mental Health Madness this week, I though it pertinent to do some research into the number of mental health-related incarnations in the United States. I stumbled across as article published in 2014 by the APA that covers exactly this. This article gives an excellent look into the history behind the growing number of mental health-related prison cases, as well as the psychological effects. I personally found the article enlightening, especially since we are given an inside look through Earley’s book on this very topic. Please check it out for yourself! I’ve provided the link down below!

Collier, Lorna. “Incarceration Nation.” American Psychological Association, October 2014. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2014/10/incarceration.

Incarnation Nation

Since we are reading Pete Earley’s Crazy: A Father’s Search Through America’s Mental Health Madness this week, I though it pertinent to do some research into the number of mental health-related incarnations in the United States. I stumbled across as article published in 2014 by the APA that covers exactly this. This article gives an excellent look into the history behind the growing number of mental health-related prison cases, as well as the psychological effects. I personally found the article enlightening, especially since we are given an inside look through Earley’s book on this very topic. Please check it out for yourself! I’ve provided the link down below!

Collier, Lorna. “Incarceration Nation.” American Psychological Association, October 2014. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2014/10/incarceration.

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