Week#7: Personality Disorders

In Girl, Interrupted, Susanna Kaysen dedicated two chapters of her book defining Borderline Personality Disorder and breaking down the diagnosis. Although she gives a good example of the disorder, I wanted to find out more about personality disorders in general. A great place to start is Crash Couse, an education Youtube Channel run by famous YouTubers John and Hank Green. The videos talk about Borderline Personality Disorder, the disorder Susanna was dignosised with, and also Antisocial Personality Disorder more commonly known as psychopathy or sociospathy. If Antisocial Personality Disorder had been defined in the 1960s, this is most likely what disorder Lisa would have been diagnosed with.

“Flowers of New England”

When sifting through sources to find out more about Dorothea Dix’s background, I stumbled upon this New York Times article titled, “Flowers of New England.” It is a piece from a book titled Three Wise Virgins, and wove together the stork of three important New-England women. It is interesting how the author weaves these women […]

Shell Shock During WWI vs Today

This video does a great job at explaining how the term Shell Shock emerged after World War I. It also does a good job at explaining how the military community had a hard time determining whether it was a physical injury or just a mental health problem. The video does a good job mentioning that the problems that effected veterans after WWI still effect our soldiers today. The main point made is that veterans suffering from PTSD (aka Shell Shock), have a hard time readjusting to normal society.

New source for Project

this isn’t an article, however, I recently was told about this book that could probably help my project. The book is called We’re Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation, by Eric Garcia. it’s a book that explains to various different groups of people what living on the spectrum is like and is written by someone with Autism.

https://www.amazon.com/Were-Not-Broken-Changing-Conversation/dp/1328587843/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=we%27re+not+broken&qid=1633565937&sr=8-1

PTSD Among Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans

Article explores the prevalence of PTSD among different military subgroups of veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. One of the findings of this article is that as of 2014, the incidence of PTSD was higher for veterans of Iraq (12.9%) compared to veterans of Afghanistan (7.1%). Authors surmise this discrepancy may be in part due to the early stages of the war in Afghanistan being of relatively low intensity. This gap has been narrowed by 2010. A complication in this study is that some veterans with PTSD served in both theaters, so it is uncertain which war caused the PTSD. This article also looks at PTSD among women veterans, which is important as women are now taking on combat roles in the military.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4168809/

Susanna Kaysen and Girl, Interrupted

While looking for information on the book we are reading for class tomorrow, I came across an interview of the author, Susanna Kaysen, herself. The interview, written by Tara Wanda Merrigan, comes twenty-five years after Kaysen first published her autobiography. During the interview Kaysen discusses some misconceptions that some readers took from the book and what the actual meanings of the book are. I have the link to the interview and article below.

https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2018/06/27/girl-interrupted-twenty-five-years-later/

Weekly Post

This attached article covers the general history of the removal homosexuality as a mental illness in the United States. It also provides context and explanations of the various theories being discussed by psychiatrists at that time as well. The role that LGBT activists had with the changing of the APA’s stance is also discussed as well within the article. Along with how even after its official removal as an illness by the APA, it was still under the umbrella of other mental illness as something abnormal. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4695779/

Gracefully Insane: The Rise and Fall of America’s Premier Mental Hospital (2001)

Book Cover from Goodreads.

In connection with our reading of Girl, Interrupted (1993) this week, I decided to dig up a source I looked at because it was also connected to my project about John Nash! McLean Hospital is the location of much of Susanna’s Kaysen’s book, and the hospital itself has a longstanding history as a mental institution. In 2001, Alex Beam published Gracefully Insane : The Rise and Fall of America’s Premier Mental Hospital which, like many other books we’ve read this semester, focuses on McLean Mental Hospital as a case study. I discovered this book after doing research into Nash’s life and was surprised when I saw Kaysen’s name, because at the time I had not read Girl, Interrupted, and was only familiar with the name because it was an assigned text for this class. In connection with our reading of Girl, Interrupted (1993) this week, I decided to dig up a source I looked at because it was also connected to my project about John Nash! McLean Hospital is the location of much of Susanna’s Kaysen’s book, and the hospital itself has a longstanding history as a mental institution.

In 2001, Alex Beam published Gracefully Insane : The Rise and Fall of America’s Premier Mental Hospital which, like many other books we’ve read this semester, focuses on McLean Mental Hospital as a case study. I discovered this book after doing research into Nash’s life and was surprised when I saw Kaysen’s name, because at the time I had not read Girl, Interrupted, and was only familiar with the name because it was an assigned text for this class. However, as I did more digging I discovered that not only did Nash and Kaysen end up in McLean, so did Ray Charles, Steven Tyler, Sylvia Plath (author of The Bell Jar, which also talks about her experiences at McLean), James Taylor, Robert Lowell, Anne Sexton, and David Foster Wallace. First off, wow, this hospital had a lot of famous patients. Secondly, Beam’s book is filled with stories about patients and doctors, including a protégé whose brilliance disappeared alongside his madness, Anne Sexton’s poetry seminar, John Nash’s stay before becoming a Nobel Prize winner, and many more. Beam’s tale of McLean covers the hopes and failures of psychology and psychotherapy (much like we have been discussing in class), the evolution of attitudes about mental illness, the differing approaches to treatment, as well as the economic pressures that are making institutions like McLean become “relics of a bygone age.”

I personally was using this book as a source to better understand the treatment John Nash received while he was at McLean, however that doesn’t mean it cannot be used by others to study McLean in a similar matter to what we have done with Nancy Tome’s work on Thomas Story Kirkbride or Wendy Gonaver’s work on the Eastern Lunatic Asylum.

Beam, Alex. Gracefully Insane: The Rise and Fall of America’s Premier Mental Hospital. New York: Public Affairs, 2001.

Gracefully Insane: The Rise and Fall of America’s Premier Mental Hospital (2001)

Book Cover from Goodreads.

In connection with our reading of Girl, Interrupted (1993) this week, I decided to dig up a source I looked at because it was also connected to my project about John Nash! McLean Hospital is the location of much of Susanna’s Kaysen’s book, and the hospital itself has a longstanding history as a mental institution. In 2001, Alex Beam published Gracefully Insane : The Rise and Fall of America’s Premier Mental Hospital which, like many other books we’ve read this semester, focuses on McLean Mental Hospital as a case study. I discovered this book after doing research into Nash’s life and was surprised when I saw Kaysen’s name, because at the time I had not read Girl, Interrupted, and was only familiar with the name because it was an assigned text for this class. In connection with our reading of Girl, Interrupted (1993) this week, I decided to dig up a source I looked at because it was also connected to my project about John Nash! McLean Hospital is the location of much of Susanna’s Kaysen’s book, and the hospital itself has a longstanding history as a mental institution.

In 2001, Alex Beam published Gracefully Insane : The Rise and Fall of America’s Premier Mental Hospital which, like many other books we’ve read this semester, focuses on McLean Mental Hospital as a case study. I discovered this book after doing research into Nash’s life and was surprised when I saw Kaysen’s name, because at the time I had not read Girl, Interrupted, and was only familiar with the name because it was an assigned text for this class. However, as I did more digging I discovered that not only did Nash and Kaysen end up in McLean, so did Ray Charles, Steven Tyler, Sylvia Plath (author of The Bell Jar, which also talks about her experiences at McLean), James Taylor, Robert Lowell, Anne Sexton, and David Foster Wallace. First off, wow, this hospital had a lot of famous patients. Secondly, Beam’s book is filled with stories about patients and doctors, including a protégé whose brilliance disappeared alongside his madness, Anne Sexton’s poetry seminar, John Nash’s stay before becoming a Nobel Prize winner, and many more. Beam’s tale of McLean covers the hopes and failures of psychology and psychotherapy (much like we have been discussing in class), the evolution of attitudes about mental illness, the differing approaches to treatment, as well as the economic pressures that are making institutions like McLean become “relics of a bygone age.”

I personally was using this book as a source to better understand the treatment John Nash received while he was at McLean, however that doesn’t mean it cannot be used by others to study McLean in a similar matter to what we have done with Nancy Tome’s work on Thomas Story Kirkbride or Wendy Gonaver’s work on the Eastern Lunatic Asylum.

Beam, Alex. Gracefully Insane: The Rise and Fall of America’s Premier Mental Hospital. New York: Public Affairs, 2001.

Weekly Posts

Oct 7, 2021

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-nPM1_kSZf91ZGkcgy_95Q

This week, I’ve decided to talk about the YouTube channel “How To ADHD” Not only is it incredibly accessible through its fun animations and quirky host, but it also maintains a solid research basis and constantly invites Ph.D.’s on to discuss current issues. Most likely, I will be doing my media analysis on this channel, as there is a lot I’d love to discuss regarding how it fights stigma and teaches people about neurodiversity.

https://www.nytimes.com/topic/subject/mental-health-and-disorders

This is a link to the New York Times’s “Mental Health” section. Personally, I think many of the articles in this section are worthwhile. However, I’ve always found their self-help articles obnoxious and catered exclusively to neurotypical people with almost no real problems. “Meditation” isn’t going to solve major depressive disorder, whereas I’m sure it’ll do wonders for the everyday suburban mom reading the NYT.

This may only be obliquely related to mental health, but the recent hearing regarding physician Larry Nassar’s repeated sexual abuse of Olympic athletes has caused many to comment on their PTSD from the experience. Many congresspeople felt compelled to state how brave these women were to speak out about such traumatic experiences, and I, for one, agree. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTZJ4SOYx6c

I’m not sure what happened to my last two submissions, but my third one is a meme depicting a secure attachment style between two neurotypical people versus an insecure attachment style between a neurotypical person and her likely BPD/Traumatized husband (yes, it’s a Star Wars meme)

https://m.facebook.com/AreYouMemeingMeMasterJedi/photos/a.1987071041558410/2703214769944030/?type=3

Jokes aside, attachment styles can change due to trauma. This is a relatively recent understanding in the therapy/psychology world.

This is a Reddit thread that communicates the stresses of Borderline Personality Disorder through memes. Although a relatively recent disorder––and therefore disagreed over its legitimacy––many people find solace in receiving a diagnosis and locating a community of people going through similar struggles.

This is a compilation of scenes from one of my favorite TV Shows (Shameless). It follows Ian (a member of the Gallagher household the show follows) as he experiences the symptoms of Bipolar Disorder. While there are certain aspects of this depiction that I have issues with, it is a mostly phenomenal take on the disorder––specifically through its exposure of how it affects both the person and their loved ones.

css.php