Documentary Outline

Frame 1: Begin with contemplative music, title slide “Douglas C. Englebart, 2010”
Frame 2: start with video interview of Doug Englebart talking about how he came up with the concept for the mouse
Engelbart, Douglas C. “Inventor of the Computer Mouse.” YouTube video. 2:03. Posted by Neoncon2008, February 25, 2010. Accessed February 20, 2017.
Frame 3: Another title slide “The Computer Mouse: Aglet of the digital world” [fade out to black]
Frame 4: Zooming in to an image of a shoe, narrator asks viewer “When you see this image, what is the first thing you notice? More than likely, your eye was not drawn to the plastic tip at the end of the lace: a vital feature to keep laces from unraveling and helping you to tie your shoes. (shift to image of aglet) This piece is called an aglet. Let’s try another.
Frame 5: Zooming into the image of a desktop computer. Narrator asks “what is the first thing you notice? The monitor? the keyboard? however I highly doubt your eye was drawn to the rounded rectangle with a cord that allows you to navigate the images on your monitor with ease. Yup, you guessed it. This digital rodent is none other than the computer mouse. Despite its mundane appearance, there is so much more to the story of the mouse than one might expect.
Frame 6: Begin discussing the process of developing the mouse. Use relevant pictures to facilitate understanding of the process from inspiration to demo
Frame 7: Show footage from the “mother of all demos”
Frame 8: Discuss more recent developments in the design of the mouse, from a block of wood to the mighty mouse by Apple
Frame 9: Feature demo video for Apple’s Mighty Mouse
“New Apple Magic Mouse Release Video.” YouTube video. 2:25. Posted by “wildwilla.” Oct 20, 2009. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRRu4dZ2Agw.
Frame 10: Talk about the future of the Mouse and how certain devices threaten its relevancy, such as trackpads and touchscreens
Frame 11: Focus on a picture of Engelbart with his mouse, narrator finishes with “no matter what the future may hold for this mechanical vermin, no one can deny the impact of the mouse on personal computing and user-friendly computer interfaces.

Storyboards for the Documentary: Drawn By Megan Palmer

Website Outline

For our website, we will divide our top menu into 4 sections: Antecedents, History, People of the Mouse, and Future of the Mouse. Each of these sections will have 3 sub-pages focused on specific topics. These topics, including their sources and images, are listed and pictured below:

Antecedents: This section of the website will be focusing on the need for a user friendly computer interface and three main antecedents which are the keyboard, joystick, and lightpen. It will also go over why the antecedents were not picked over the mouse.

Page 1: Keyboard
This page will go over the history of the keyboard and how it was used before the mouse, and why it was not picked. It was one of the more advanced antecedents

Sources:
Roch, Axel. “Fire-Control and Human-Computer Interaction: Towards a History of the Computer Mouse (1940-1965).” Lab. Jahrbuch der Kunsthochschule für Medien in Köln, August 28, 1998. Accessed February 20, 2017. http://web.stanford.edu/dept/SUL/library/prod//siliconbase/wip/control.html

Images:

“An Early Keyboard Manufactured in Poland in 1976.” Digital Image. Vintage Stock Pictures. Accessed March 16, 2017. https://vintagestock.pictures/early-computer-keyboard/

Cover photo:

“Apple II Personal Computer.” Digital Image. Smithsonian Institute. Accessed March 16, 2017. http://collections.si.edu/search/tag/tagDoc.htm?recordID=nmah_334638

Page 2: Joystick
This page will discuss the history of the joystick, and why it was not picked. The joystick was one of the first antecedents, and one of the most important.The mouse and the joystick are both pointer devices, but the joystick had other jobs that fit it better than being the main computer interface tool.

Sources:
Roch, Axel. “Fire-Control and Human-Computer Interaction: Towards a History of the Computer Mouse (1940-1965).” Lab. Jahrbuch der Kunsthochschule für Medien in Köln, August 28, 1998. Accessed February 20, 2017. http://web.stanford.edu/dept/SUL/library/prod//siliconbase/wip/control.html

Images:

“Franklin Ace Personal Computer.” Digital Image. Smithsonian Institute. Accessed March 16, 2017. http://collections.si.edu/search/tag/tagDoc.htm?recordID=nmah_998404

Cover Picture:

“Joystick.” Digital Image.Tutorials Point Simplicity Learning. Accessed March 16, 2017. https://www.tutorialspoint.com/computer_fundamentals/computer_quick_guide.htm

Page 3: Lightpen
This page will be the history of the lightpen and why it was not chosen. The lightpen was created as a computer interface that touched the screen of the computer.
Sources:
Roch, Axel. “Fire-Control and Human-Computer Interaction: Towards a History of the Computer Mouse (1940-1965).” Lab. Jahrbuch der Kunsthochschule für Medien in Köln, August 28, 1998. Accessed February 20, 2017. http://web.stanford.edu/dept/SUL/library/prod//siliconbase/wip/control.html
Images:

“IBM 2250 from a 1968 Sikorsky Aircraft Ad.” Digital Image. Columbia University Computing History. Accessed March 16, 2017. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/2250.html

Cover photo:

“IBM 2250 and 1130 at EXPO ‘70 US Pavilion.” Digital Image. Columbia University Computing History. Accessed March 16, 2017. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/2250.html

History:
This part will focus on the history of the mouse starting with it’s conception, the process, and ending with the mouse being awarded a patent in 1970.

– Engelbart’s Daydream (page 1)
I will focus on the story of how Engelbart came up with the idea for the mouse while sitting in a class about computer graphics.

(Cover Photo) The First Computer Mouse (about 1964).” SRI International. Digital Image. MouseSite. Accessed March 16, 2017. http://web.stanford.edu/dept/SUL/library/extra4/sloan/MouseSite/Archive/patent/Mouse.html

“Drawing from Engelbart’s Patent”. Digital Image. MouseSite. Accessed March 16, 2017.http://web.stanford.edu/dept/SUL/library/extra4/sloan/MouseSite/Archive/patent/Mouse.html

-”Augmenting Human Intellect” (page 2)
This page will focus on Engelbart’s research team and the process in which the computer
mouse was invented.

(cover photo)
“Computer-supported Meeting- circa 1967.” Digital Image. Doug Engelbart Institute. Accessed March 16, 2017. http://dougengelbart.org/site/images/img0003.jpg

“The First Mouse Plugged Into Its Display Workstation circa 1964.”Digital Image. Doug Engelbart Institute. Accessed March 16, 2017. http://dougengelbart.org/site/images/img0023.jpg

The Mother of All Demos (Page 3)
This section will end with the “mother of all demos” exhibition in 1968 and then then the mouse receiving its patent in 1970.

(Cover photo)
“1968 Demo.” Digital Image. Doug Engelbart Archive. Acessed March 16, 2017. http://dougengelbart.org/library/engelbart-archives.html

Engelbart, Christina and the Bootstrap Institute. Digital Image. “Original Annoucement of the 1968 Demo.” MouseSite. 1968. March 16, 2017. http://web.stanford.edu/dept/SUL/library/extra4/sloan/MouseSite/1968Demo.html

Engelbart, Douglas C. “Inventor of the Computer Mouse.” YouTube video. 2:03. Posted by Neoncon2008, February 25, 2010. Accessed February 20, 2017. https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=SQ7totFRh4g

Greenemeier, Larry. “The Origin of the Computer Mouse: Now an Endangered Species, it was Crucial to the Development of Personal Computing and Internet.” Scientific American, August 18, 2009. Accessed February 20, 2017. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/origins-computer-mouse/

People of the Mouse:

This page will revolve around the individuals that were involved with the invention of the original computer mouse. Not only will it discuss the person whose name is most recognized as linked to the initial invention, but also the people that he worked with in order to develop the final original product.

Sources:

Engelbart, Douglas C. “Inventor of the Computer Mouse.” YouTube video. 2:03. Posted by Neoncon2008, February 25, 2010. Accessed February 20, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQ7totFRh4g

English, William K., Douglas C, Engelbart, and Melvyn L. Berman. “Display-Selection Techniques for Text Manipulation.” IEEE Transaction on Human Factors in Electronics 8, no. 1 (March 1967): 5-15.

Living History: The Doug Engelbart Archive. Doug Engelbart Institute. Accessed February 20, 2017. http://www.dougengelbart.org/library/engelbart-archives.html

Greenemeier, Larry. “The Origin of the Computer Mouse: Now an Endangered Species, it was Crucial to the Development of Personal Computing and Internet.” Scientific American, August 18, 2009. Accessed February 20, 2017. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/origins-computer-mouse/

Images:

Bill English with Computer. Digital Image. History of the Computer. Accessed March 15, 2017.
http://history-computer.com/ModernComputer/Basis/mouse.html

Doug Engelbart (used as cover image): http://history-computer.com/ModernComputer/Basis/mouse.html

Douglas Engelbart in 1984. Digital Image. History of the Computer. Accessed March 15, 2017. http://history-computer.com/ModernComputer/Basis/mouse.html

Future:
-Recent changes/influences in the mouse’s design (Page 1)
On this page, I will focus on the changes in the computer mouse’s design after Engelbart’s initial design. I will discuss the influences of major computer companies like Xerox and Apple on the design and improvements of the mouse over time. Some of these improvements include a change in shape to a more ergonomic form, a cheaper design, and a simpler composition that makes mass production a lot easier.

Sources:
*Atkinson, Paul. “The Best Laid Plans of Mice and Men: The Computer Mouse in the History of Computing.” Design Issues 23, no. 3 (Summer 2007): 49-61.
This is a scholarly journal article that explains the mouse’s historical development and how companies such as Xerox and Apple played a major role in both its design and manufacture.
*Pang, Alex Soojung-Kim. “Mighty Mouse.” Stanford Magazine,March/April 2002. Accessed February 20, 2017.http://alumni.stanford.edu/get/page/magazine/article/?article_id=37694
* Bevier, Katie, Mohit Mehendale, Cy Abdelnour, and Curtis Sawdon. “Designing an Ergonomic Computer Mouse.” Univeristy of Michigan, 2011. Accessed March 16, 2017. http://umich.edu/~desci501/2011/Team10/APD11_T10_FINALREPORT.pdf

Images:
Herrman, John. “Logitech Timeline of Mousery.” Digital Image. Gizmodo. Dec 3, 2008. March 16, 2017.https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2008/12/logitech_timeline_of_mousery_is_full_of_memories_logitech_advertising-2/

(cover photo)
“The how many buttons does your mouse have poll.” Digital Image. McNeel Forums. August, 2016. March 16, 2017.https://discourse.mcneel.com/t/the-how-many-buttons-has-your-mouse-got-poll/36300/11

“The how many buttons does your mouse have poll.” Digital Image. McNeel Forums. August, 2016. March 16, 2017. https://discourse.mcneel.com/t/the-how-many-buttons-has-your-mouse-got-poll/36300/11

-The track pad: the critics have spoken (Page 2)
This page will feature reviews of the trackpad when compared to the mouse. All of the reviews come from ordinary users and illustrate the importance of personal needs and preference. These real-life opinions help show the impact that these technologies have directly on the average consumer in today’s tech society.
Sources:
*“A Week With The Magic Trackpad: It’s Bye Bye Mouse Forever [Review].” Cult of Mac, August 8, 2010. http://www.cultofmac.com/54210/a-week-with-the-magic-trackpad-bye-bye-mouse-forever-review/.

*“Apple Magic Trackpad 2 Review: Solid Performer Doesn’t Feel Essential.” Macworld, October 20, 2015. http://www.macworld.com/article/2995044/input-devices/apple-magic-trackpad-2-review-solid-performer-doesnt-feel-essential.html.

* Kendrick, James. “One Week With the Magic Trackpad — No Pain,” August 9, 2010. https://gigaom.com/2010/08/09/one-week-with-the-magic-trackpad-no-pain/.

Images:
(cover photo)

Op editor. “Magic Trackpad Unboxing by Apple Mouse Stop Motion Video.” Digital Image. Obama Pacman. August, 2010. March 16, 2017. http://obamapacman.com/2010/08/magic-trackpad-unboxing-by-apple-mouse-stop-motion-video/

Jade, Charles. “Review: Apple Magic Trackpad a Futile Gesture.” Digital Image. Gigaom. August, 2010. March 16, 2017.https://gigaom.com/2010/08/02/apple-magic-trackpad-review/

The touch screen revolution: Could the mouse become obsolete? (Page 3)
This final page will focus on the possibility that the mouse could actually become an obsolete piece of technology and the devices that could replace it, especially touch screens. At first, I will discuss the selection of the mouse itself and then dive into the reasons why touch screens may be viewed as superior technology. However, this is a very open-ended discussion with numerous possible outcomes. At best, touchscreens and computer mice are coexisting technologies.

Sources:
* English, William K., Douglas C, Englebart, and Melvyn L. Berman. “Display-Selection Techniques for Text Manipulation.” IEEE Transaction on Human Factors in Electronics 8, no. 1 (March 1967): 5-15.
*Forlines, Clifton, Daniel Wigdor, Chia Shen, and Ravin Balakrishnan. “Direct-Touch vs. Mouse Input for Tabletop Displays.” Paper presented in SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI ’07. New York, NY, 2007.

*Anonymous. “Goodbye, Computer Mouse.” Communications of the ACM 51, no. 9 (September 2008): 16.

“Kabbash, Paul, William Buxton and Abigail Sellen. “Two-Handed Input in a Compound Task.” Paper presented at the Computer-Human Interface Conference, Boston, MA, April 1994.

*http://www.theverge.com/2016/10/27/13443914/the-new-mac-vs-pc-war-is-all-about-touch (Mac vs. PC touchscreen computer wars)
Images


Russell, Patrick. “Touchscreen Desktops: Yay or nay?” Digital Image. Usability Geek. December, 2013. March 16, 2017. http://usabilitygeek.com/touchscreen-desktops-yay-nay/

“Mouseless.” Digital Image. Projects. June, 2013. March 16, 2017. http://students.iitk.ac.in/projects/eclub_evomouse (Cover photo)

Key Image

Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III, Joint training at Valiant Shield, 2006, digital, Wikimedia, accessed March 16, 2017, https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/21/B2PlanView.jpg/800px-B2PlanView.jpg.
Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III, Joint training at Valiant Shield, 2006, digital, Wikimedia, accessed March 16, 2017, https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/21/B2PlanView.jpg/800px-B2PlanView.jpg.

Skeleton Outline

List of Media:

097

“From the Archives: When Denim Was Dangerous.” Levi Explore. April 11, 2013.  Accessed March 16, 2017.                                                                                                                                                    http://explore.levi.com/news/culture/from-the-archives-when-denim-was-dangerous/.

082

“From the Archives: When Denim Was Dangerous.” Levi Explore. April 11, 2013. Accessed March 16, 2017.                                                                                                   http://explore.levi.com/news/culture/from-the-archives-when-denim-was-dangerous/.

“Fashion Display Milestones .” Fashion Display Milestones. November 2013. http://digital.history.umass.edu/dress/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Levis-jeans-billboard.jpg.

070

“From the Archives: When Denim Was Dangerous.” Levi Explore. April 11, 2013. Accessed March 16, 2017.                                                                                                   http://explore.levi.com/news/culture/from-the-archives-when-denim-was-dangerous/.

Iconic Image:

Levi’s Corporation. “Our Story.” Levi Strauss.

The timeline is under the history tab.

Books Being used

Download (DOCX, 11KB)

List of Media

Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Bobbie Garcia, B-2 Spirit, 2015, digital, United States Air Force, accessed March 16, 2017, http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/FactSheets/Display/tabid/224/Article/104482/b-2-spirit.aspx.
Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III, Joint training at Valiant Shield, 2006, digital, Wikimedia, accessed March 16, 2017, https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/21/B2PlanView.jpg/800px-B2PlanView.jpg.
Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III, Joint training at Valiant Shield, 2006, digital, Wikimedia, accessed March 16, 2017, https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/21/B2PlanView.jpg/800px-B2PlanView.jpg.
Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III, B-2 Spirit, 2006, Wikimedia, accessed March 16, 2017, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:B-2_Spirit_original.jpg.
Staff Sgt. Bennie J. Davis III, B-2 Spirit, 2006, Wikimedia, accessed March 16, 2017, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:B-2_Spirit_original.jpg.
Master Sgt. Val Gempis, Andersen Air Force Base, 2004, Wikimedia, accessed March 16, 2017, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:B-2_Spirit_050413-F-1740G-001a.jpg.
Master Sgt. Val Gempis, Andersen Air Force Base, 2004, Wikimedia, accessed March 16, 2017, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:B-2_Spirit_050413-F-1740G-001a.jpg.

Story Board

Block 1: Opens on a woman in the kitchen, frantically running around checking on things in the oven and on the stovetop. ~1 minute

Block 2: She dramatically drops things and halfway cooked food exclaiming that her meal will never be ready by the time her in-laws get there ~2 minutes

Block 3: Freeze frame to a narrator’s voice over. The narrator explains how difficult and time consuming each antecedent is. “Don’t you wish there was something better?”

Block 4: Cut to a shot of the microwave “Well now there is!” ~1 minute

Block 5: Shot of the original commercial microwave, which was 6 feet tall and 750 pounds.

 

Block 6: Narrator explains how the microwave was initially used ~3 minutes

Block 7: The Microwave become smaller and more compact, became more widely available in homes ~3 minutes

 

Block 8: Video on how the microwave works basics ~20 seconds

 

Block 9: Interview with Helen’s mom about how the microwave impacted her and how she used it ~2 minutes

 

Block 10: Video montage of ramen, cookies, eggs, popcorn, and easy mac cooking

Block 11: Typical college students jumps into frame to announce what they use the microwave for now a days ~2 minutes

 

Block 12: Mockumentary style interview of college student about how they use a microwave now ~30 seconds

Block 13: Cut to a normal American kitchen with a microwave

 

Block 14: Narrator describes how American kitchens use microwaves now ~3 minutes

https://www.wired.com/images_blogs/thisdayintech/2010/10/Radarange_first.jpg

Block 15: Cut to the same woman who was panicking in the beginning to her calmly making food quickly in her microwave

 

Block 16: Narrator summarizes the impact that microwaves have had on the American home ~3 minutes

Block 17: Fade to family sitting around the kitchen table eating fade to block

 

Block 18: Credits and citations

 

Total time is around 20 minutes. This gives us areas to cut once we start to really flesh out the video and see what works and what doesn’t. All images were published with the ability for reuse and are under no copyright.

 

Skeleton Outline

List of Media:

097

“From the Archives: When Denim Was Dangerous.” Levi Explore. April 11, 2013.  Accessed March 16, 2017.                                                                                                                                                    http://explore.levi.com/news/culture/from-the-archives-when-denim-was-dangerous/.

082

“From the Archives: When Denim Was Dangerous.” Levi Explore. April 11, 2013. Accessed March 16, 2017.                                                                                                   http://explore.levi.com/news/culture/from-the-archives-when-denim-was-dangerous/.

“Fashion Display Milestones .” Fashion Display Milestones. November 2013. http://digital.history.umass.edu/dress/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Levis-jeans-billboard.jpg.

070

“From the Archives: When Denim Was Dangerous.” Levi Explore. April 11, 2013. Accessed March 16, 2017.                                                                                                   http://explore.levi.com/news/culture/from-the-archives-when-denim-was-dangerous/.

Iconic Image:

Levi’s Corporation. “Our Story.” Levi Strauss.

The timeline is under the history tab.

 

Story Board

We will be creating our documentary using the Production Studio in the Hurley Convergence Center.

Below I have outlined the basics for how we will complete our documentary.

The 1st person will sit down and talk for about 3-4 mins about the early history of blue jeans and Levi Strauss, the Antecedent to jeans (why jeans were needed). While they talk, the green screen behind them will have pictures of early pants used before jeans, Levi’s life and his jeans playing behind them, and possibly videos as well.

The 2nd person will talk for about 3-4 minutes about the advertisements Levi used and how his team advertised their jeans in the beginning for the working class and later moved onto everyday people. Behind them, there will be pictures playing of different posters that were used for advertisements and we will play a commercial for Levi jeans as well. Also, they will talk about factories being made for the production of jeans, because the advertisement was so heavily used, jeans became high in demand leading to bigger and more factories being made.

The 3rd person will talk about the competition shortly after Levi and how the other companies advertised in different ways and used celebrities to promote the jeans. Competition for Levi jeans forced expanding from just making jeans for the working man and became more inclusive to families. Behind them, we will show some other advertisements used for jeans like Lee Jeans as well as other brands that were emerging after Levis.

The 4th person will talk about the modern development of jeans. Now we have so many different companies, brands, and styles. Everyone wears them despite being created years ago. They will cover the impact overall jeans have had in history and in recent modern years.

Skeleton Outline

Skeleton Outline

Proposals and Outlines- Under this tab we will post our project proposal as well as our skeleton outline for the website and documentary.

Antecedents- Here we will list the antecedents that were used before Tupperware was invented,  we will also be posting corresponding images so that viewers can see what the available items looked like.

Storage Antecedents:

  • Mason Jars
  • Pyrex (glass)
  • Glassware
  • Oval wooden shakers

Marketing Antecedents:

  • Department stores salesmen (women)
  • Door to Door salesmen (birth control)
  • Home parties (Brownie Wise, Stanley)

History of Tupperware

  1. This section will talk about how Earl Tupper invented tupperware while he was making plastic products for the war. Although he had his products sold in stores and in house parties, his sales were not taking off and he was struggling to turn a profit.
  2. This section will also discuss Brownie Wise, how she became involved with Tupperware and her impact on tupperware sales and beyond. Brownie Wise, currently selling products for Stanley Home Products and wanted to help Tupperware by increasing sales in the home. She was later promoted to VP of the Tupperware company.

Impact of Tupperware

  1. This section will discuss how Brownie’s home parties revolutionized sales, and empowered women to be entrepreneurs while working from home.
  2. It will also discuss the impact that it has had on competing brands as well as how Tupperware has become a common household name for a product, even if they are a different brand.
  3. Endorsed gender stereotypes by maintaining home space as a place for women, even though women could profit off of it.

Documentary- Here we will post our mockumentary and the sources we used to produce it.

Timeline/storymap

-Antecedents:

  • Marketing: birth control during 1930s
  • Brownie Wise marketing,
  • Glass-precursor
  • Plastics: After WWII

-Tupperware’s Evolution and Origin

  • Tupper’s initial idea: playing with plastic
  • Meet with Brownie Wise=TUPPERWARE PARTIES.

Documentary outline:

  • Time frame: 10-15 minutes
  • Yousef- Earl Tupper, narrator
  • Emma- Brownie Wise
  • Emily and Nicole- women at a Tupperware party
  • 1950s era style and dress
  • Mockumentary begins with Earl Tupper (a DuPont employee) tries to create a product with plastic
  • Eventually creates Tupperware bowl and lid
  • Struggles to sell product
  • Mockumentary will show Tupper’s failed attempts to market and sell product
  • Brownie Wise notices that Tupperware was not selling at department stores
  • Brownie Wise and Earl Tupper meet on Tinder (maybe)
  • Meets Brownie Wise
  • She comes up with innovative way to sell Tupperware: Tupperware parties
  • Mockumentary demonstrates Wise marketing Tupperware to women at parties
  • Emma, Emily and/or Nicole bring up antecedents (ie glassware)
  • Ex: “My food has gone bad!”; “My glass container broke AGAIN!”
  • Wise also discusses how becoming a Tupperware entrepreneur is the best way for women to make money without
  • A jealous Tupper grows resentful of Wise, confronts her and fires her after a year
  • Flash-forward to modern age: Tupperware is a staple in kitchens across the country
  • Talk about other products that have been influenced by tupperware or direct sales
  • Companies like Glad and Pyrex enter the market and create their own “food storage containers”
  • Talk about how even brands that aren’t technically tupperware (glad, ziploc, rubbermaid) people still refer to it as tupperware (common household name)  
  • Impact of tupperware: flash forward to a present day kitchen with tupperware
  • Emily and Nicole talk about how Tupperware is overlooked in our society
  • Ex: “We take Tupperware for granted.”; “What would we ever do without Tupperware?”
  • Ghosts of Tupper and Wise proudly reflect on their contributions (maybe)

List of media (image, videos, etc.).

Iconic image:

Steinmetz, Joe, photographer. “[Tupperware advertisement featuring a Joe Steinmetz photograph.]” Photograph. C1958. From State Library and Archives of Florida. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tupperware_advertisement_featuring_a_Joe_Steinmetz_photograph_(9005296853).jpg (accessed March 16, 2017).

Pictures and advertisements:

Brownie Wise Papers, 1938-1968, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. AC0509-0000003

Catalog Advertisement” scanned advertisement. Brownie Wise Papers, National Museum of American History Archives Center, circa 1949-1966. AC0509-0000066. .

“Earl Tupper and Brownie Wise at the Tupperware factory in Farnumsville, Massachusetts,” 1951, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.

Tupper, Earl. Open mouth container and nonsnap type of closure. US Patent 2487400 filed June 2, 1947, and issued November 8, 1949.

“Tupperware Price and Order Form,” scanned document. Brownie Wise Papers, National Museum of American History Archives Center. Circa 1951-1959.

Antecedent pictures:

TwoScarsUp, photographer “[Glass canisters made by Sneath Glass Company for Hoosier Cabinets.]” Photograph. c2008.  From wikipedia commons. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sneath_Glass_Company_canisters_for_Hoosier_Cabinets.jpg (accessed March 16, 2017).

Wycoff, Carl. “[Images of items found at the Shake Village at Pleasant Hill.]” Photograph. Nevada, USA. c2009.From The Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Boxes_in_the_Shaker_Village_at_Pleasant_Hill-RZ.jpg (accessed March 16, 2017).

“Look at What All She Got for Christmas!” Better Homes and Garden, 1958, advertisement. “Saltycotton,” Flickrcommons, taken 2010.

“[Unidentified stacks of home-canned food.]” Photograph. From Library of Congress: World War, 1939-1945 Home food processing United States. Transparencies– Color. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PreservedFood1.jpg (accessed March 16, 2017).

YouTube advertisements:

“The Tupperware Party – The Product & Its Many Home Uses – Storage to Gifts – 1950’s,” Historia – Bel99TV, 2013. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZyGasL0WYg

Tupperware television commercial for their 10th anniversary,” Jeff Quitney, advertisement, 2016. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SV-K9KfFwBs